Midway's Prairie Restoration

Prairie Restoration at Midway Village Museum

The Midwest is fortunate to be home to a wide variety of native plants; which are unique to this region. These plants range from shrubs and flowers, to tall grasses and trees. While aesthetically pleasing, native plants have also played an important role in our local environment for thousands of years. According to the Illinois Department of Natural Resources, “blooming time [of native plants] coordinates with the activity of their pollinators.” Pollinators like beetles, butterflies, and bees rely on nectar from native plants as their main food source. In turn, these plants hugely depend on these pollinators to aid them in their reproduction each season. Having active pollinators with an abundance of plants will lead to more productive and nutritious food sources for other insects, wildlife, and humans. 

Midway Village Museum and Heritage Garden volunteers are actively involved in establishing and expanding our area’s native landscape through Prairie Restoration. This area is located between the Gray and Red Barns on the west side of the Victorian Village and is home to an array of native plants like spider wart, prairie dock, stiff goldenrod, among many others. Additionally, right next door on the east side of the Museum is the Guildford County Forest Preserve. This preserve features a savannah which is home to several oak trees.

Midway's Prairie Restoration